Trying 3 New Poses

Gandha berundasana/ viparita salabhasana

What makes something keep captivating is the challenge that it offers. So is in yoga. When it comes to challenges, yoga offers an endless supply of challenges. New asanas, the proper breathing technique are only two I have to learn a lot these days.

As holding breath is not advisable while doing yoga, one has to keep breathing deeply while holding a pose or asana. It’s not a big deal when you’re used to a pose. A pose is easy, to me, when I can still breathe as deeply as I want to while holding them for several cycles of breathing (some sets of inhaling and exhaling).

 

Yanti Warso, a yogini, helped me hold this challenging pose for a while.

Very recently, I tried to try new poses. Gandha berundasana (viparita salabhasana), as Yanti Warso calls it, is one of them. She said the Sanskrit word means literally “terrible cheek”. I saw the pose in a book and gave it a try. At the very first attempt, I had no idea how to reach the pose. But then I saw on Youtube how John Scott, an ashtanga yogi, initiated the pose. At first I thought I would break my neck or hip or waist or my entire torso and spine but that was just my groundless paranoia. By kicking frontwards and bending my waist backwards, it feels much easier.

The full locust pose disrupts the normal breathing cycle because positioning the neck on the extending torso increases the resistance in the respiratory channels, not to mention it’s against the gravity.

The next two is bakasana (crane pose) turning to handstand. It proves to be extremely advanced pose to those with heavy-built posture, but bakasana is quite easy to me. All I need is a pair of more stronger arms to support the rest of body. And if I manage to do that, I can someday erect my folded torso gradually without anyone else’s assistance like now.

Bakasana or crane pose.

About akhlis

Writer & yogi
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