What? You Need to Be More Extroverted to Be a Writer?

At the first time, what snapped in my mind when someone says “writer” is introversion. The writing world is, to me,  the quiet and peaceful utopian world where someone with the tendency of introversion can safely earn a living without getting too much tortured by the hectic world of extroversion.

Upon learning this, I set myself to be a writer. I quit my teaching gigs and never came back. Never will… I get hooked in the writing world already.

All I have on my mind is always how to become a great writer. That’s literally my lifelong mission, something to accomplish that I don’t feel reluctant to throw everything I have into.

Yet, things at times don’t go the way you wish.

Writers these days need to be a lot more extroverted and willingly celebrity-like to some extent. Author of a book on introversion Quiet, Susan Cain, during one of her interviews explained she had a difficult time at the beginning, ensuring her then potential publisher that she is really capable of public speaking, a skill deemed crucial for a writer for a successful book marketing and selling. Extremely shocking, isn’t it?

I can still understand if a writer must gather a substantial number of social media followers and fans but having to be a writer who can speak in public is also something relatively new to me. At least to me.

Back then, it was quite normal for writers to discuss literary works amidst a small exclusive circle comprising fellow writers but now apparently they have to expand the circle also, by letting strangers who read their works in and exchange opinions.

It is a blast… And an end for a reclusive writers era of JD Salinger, who upheld his privacy more than anything else. It is an era of extroverted authors like Elizabeth Gilbert, David Sedaris, Ann Patchett, who all willingly reveal their treasured intimate memories and details for the rest of the world.

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