What’s the Point in Receiving Something I’ll Only Have to Send Back?

Says, or writes David Sedaris on page 45 of “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls”. In the episode titled “A Friend in the Ghetto”, Sedaris tells us a man who calls him “mr. Sedriz”. But this wrong pronunciation and outlandish accent makes Sedaris stay in the conversation for the time longer than he expected. He admits he enjoys the phone conversation.

Isn’t it great to have a sales person like the unknown man on the phone? So pushy but he has got the power to make Sedaris miss him, having another pointless conversation with the man about the new cell phone offer that offers more cutting edge features like taking your own selfies in better resolution.

The man may not close a deal with Sedaris and sucks based on commercialism point of view but from the humanity point of view, he is someone to reckon with. He is a creature with personality Sedaris and others won’t easily forget. Not a mere non descript voice on the other end of the line.

Is that what Sedaris is trying to point out? That’s my best guess. Or maybe Sedaris feels so lonely and needs someone to talk to and with. Whoever it is doesn’t really matter.

My Book Crush: The Mundane yet Mindblowingly Successful Book “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls”

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Anyone has got his or her own crush, whether it be a guy crush, girl crush, coffee crush, shoes crush. Besides gadget crush, I’ve got this book crush, which is way more affordable than the aforementioned.

I can’t help myself hopping for joy upon getting “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls”, one of the most anticipated books of David Sedaris at a bookstore I frequent. I like it too because of the color of the cover. Brown, chocolate, woody. And oh, my dad is also a diabetic.

I saw the book more than a month ago and kept seeing that displayed for weeks after since. And at last, the temptation conquered me. I couldn’t say no forever every time I saw it.

There’s nothing particularly extraordinary, or shocking, or curiosity arousing that one can get from the stories written in it. The stories have no traditional villains that possess super power to abuse like Magneto who can read anyone else’s mind, no ‘cool’ conflicts which any serious, earnest authors would never write without. Sedaris’ stories are so so so usual and ordinary. If I can compare, it’s like your own personal diary but Sedaris’ looks more than just sentences written for diaries. The words are meant to be told. There’s some interactiveness in the tone. Sedaris’ wrote it as if he wrote a personal letter to his own pen pal, which wroked so great. The way he writes just like the way he tells funny stories.

There’re 26 brief stories in Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls. One of the most interesting recounts is when he told the readers the sour relationship with his own biological father. I totally can relate to that. As a son with less-than-impressive physical ability, size and strength, I know how hurt it may get for a child to be compared with other kids who the father thinks are much better than his own offspring. Now every time people compare me to someone else, I shun these folks because they choke me to death mentally.

His jokes are witty and so selectively picked you won’t get offended. And of course I can sense a great deal of cynicism and sarcasm, two things a great author has to possess.

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